Posts Tagged ‘ Deer ’

Sighting In

I was helping out at the Lincoln Ike’s Hunter Sight In day today and am amazed at how many people only shoot their deer rifles once a year and then are frustrated when they can’t make the shot.  Sighting in is important (even if the gun shot well last year) but so is shooting throughout the year to keep your edge. 

If you have not sighted in your rifle for the November 13 opener its not too late.  You owe it to the deer and the time you have invested in the hunt.  Here are a few tips:

1. Sight in from a bench for the most steady hold possible.  You want to see what the gun will do not how skilled you are.

2. Use sandbags or a good rifle/handgun rest.

3. A quick method for sighting in is to fire one round at the target center at 100 yards.  Now see where the bullet actually hit.  While holding the crosshairs on the bullseye, move use the scope turrets to move the crosshairs now over to the bullet hole.  Now fire another round at the bullseye.  You should be on!

4. Now fire a three shot group (always three shots…then make adjustments). 

5. After a three shot group, clean the bore prior to the next group.

6. When making scope adjustments, remember most scopes move the point of aim 1/4″ per click at 100 yards.

7. Once sighted in, take a few shots using the type of rest you will use in the field.  Your groups will open a bit but that is okay.  As long as you can keep all shots fired into a 9″ pie plate you are good to go.  If everything is working, you should expect groups no larger than 3″ from the bench at 100 yards.  Don’t forget the eye and ear protection!

You will be amazed at how good it feels to head to the deer woods with the confidence of a well sighted in rifle that you know how to shoot well!  That is a skill to be proud of!

Get Em’ Out There

Rawly

Experts work with hunters to prep them for deer season at the Lincoln Ikes

Sighting in requires a good rest and sometimes a bit of coaching

Advertisements

Doe Down

This would have to be the shortest hunt I have ever made.  I asked Hershy if he would fly solo on the Nebraska Outdoors Radio show so I could spend an evening in the deer woods.   As it turned out, I left the office later than planned (what else is new) and found myself walking to my stand around 5pm.  Once I arrived to the my ash tree throne, I noticed I had left my safety line in the truck.  Walked back, found the line and back to the tree.  Once safely fastened to that herbaceous beauty I call a tree stand, I brought up my bow and knocked an arrow.  As I was knocking the arrow I noticed a big doe entering the woods to my left.  As luck would have it she chose a trail that would place her 20 yards in front of me but she would not stop walking.  With heart pounding and eyes wide open, I gave out my best baahh.  She stopped dead in her tracks and I let the Montec loose.  A beautiful double lung shot!  She ran under 20 yards and started for the ground.  I truly appreciate not having to blood trail any critter.  I canceled my tag and left the stand with a huge smile on my face.  I think my hunt took a total of 15 minutes but what a time!  We are now enjoying the first batch of black pepper and sweet bourbon jerky from that deer and what a treat! 

Tele-check – I absolutely love this system.  So easy to check in deer now and allow time for taking care of the meat.  Good move!

I keyed in on this stand as it sits in timber at the edge of a crick bed adjacent to a CRP field that is excellent bedding as well as harvested corn and bean fields.  I will be back in this one soon!

Get Em’ Out There

Rawly

Sometimes things just work out!

Do Deer Really Study The Moon?

Much has been said about deer movement in regards to the various phases of the moon and I will offer my limited observations on this.  Now some may say….”Jeff…how can you comment on the moon having never been to the moon before?”  These observations come from the physical phenomena of being able to look UP.  Looking up, I have been able to notice when the moon is fully visible and what my hunting conditions have been like the next day or so.  Very scientific. 

Some researchers, such as Charles Alzheimer, have powerful data suggesting the full moon triggers rutting activity in deer.  From his research, some have concluded that the first full moon after the autumn equinox, the hunters moon (Oct. 23, 2010), triggers rutting activity, while the second full moon after the autumn equinox hovers around the time rutting activity peaks (Nov. 21 for 2010).  We have long known that day length is a primary trigger for changes in testosterone in deer, stimulating rutting behavior.  What we are not as clear on is how the moon may impact these changes.  One could argue it makes sense because wildlife tune into such constants that are consistent for thousands of years.  Maybe there is something to these sci-fi theories? 

Before you completely discount moon phases on animal behavior, keep in mind many law enforcement and medical facilities have documented strange behavioral abnormalities during nights with full moons.  Are we influenced by the moon?  The maternity ward at some hospitals would suggest so!

My own experience has told me that on full moon nights, morning deer movement will be subdued but mid day activity will be higher.   This may be because deer take advantage of moon lit nights and feed longer, therefor are not as active in the 6am – 10am range?  It would make sense that deer who have not been active since say…4am would need to get up and move around by noon or so the next day.    Regardless, I subscribe to the theory of hunting when you can, regardless of what the lunar tables and telescopes suggest.  One constant is for sure…you can’t shoot a deer if your not out there!”  I wonder what impact Saturn has on deer?

Get Em’ Out There

Rawly

Phases of the moon - can they predict deer behavior?

Must be a full moon fight?

Wild Game, The Original Green Movement

Thousands of us nuts love to invest hundreds of hours each year chasing the wild turkey across all the haunts it calls home.  We do this for too many reasons to list here but one reason is because of the awesome culinary experience that wild turkeys, along with most wild game, give us.  They are tasty, nutritious, full of low fat protein and just fun to tinker with when inventing new ways to prepare them.  Their meat is lean,  and they are a part of the original organic movement!  According to the National Wild Turkey Federation, www.nwtf.org   game meat is richer in antioxidants and contains more of the healthy fats and less bad fats.  A report by the Mayo Clinic www.mayoclinic.com also suggests wild game contains lower cholesterol levels when compared to domesticated meats.  The table below from TNOutdoorsman www.tnoutdoorsman.com provides nutrition info for various wild game.

Of course, the ultimate reason we all chase wild critters is for the absolute fun, relaxation, time with friends and family, to be one with nature, develop our natural skills and be a part of a several thousand year old heritage.  The fact that all this is actually good for us just makes it all the better!

Get Em’ Out There

Rawly

Serving Size (3.5 oz)
Fat (Grams)
Cholesterol (Milligrams)
Calories
Turkey (Young Tom)
7.5
72
154
Quail (One Whole)
13.1
83
209
Pheasant
9.29
71
181
Goose (Domestic)
33.6
80
371
Duck
15.2
80
211
Dove (cooked)
13.00
116
219
Elk
1.5
55
111
Deer
2.4
85
120
Antelope
2
95
114
Wild Boar (cooked)
3.4
77
122
Bear (cooked)
8.3
98
161
Squirrel
3.2
83
120
Beaver (cooked)
4.8
117
146
Frog Legs
0.30
50
73
Turtle (green)
0.50
50
89
Rabbit
2.3
81
114
Beaver (roasted)
6.96
117
212
Muskrat
8.1
no data
162
Emu
4.03
69
134
Opossum
10.20
129
221
Serving Size (3.5 oz)
Fat (Grams)
Cholesterol (Milligrams)
Calories
Rainbow Trout
3.5
59
119
Catfish (Channel)
2.8
58
95
Crappie
.8
90
79
Bass
3.7
68
114
Carp
5.6
66
127
Drum
4.9
64
119
Walleye
1.2
86
93
Northern Pike
.7
39
88
Perch
.9
90
91
Sunfish
.7
67
89
Striped Bass
2.33
80
97
White Sucker
2.32
41
92
King Salmon (Alaska)
11.73
61
190
Mussels (blue)
2.24
28
86
Shad
13.77
75
197
Eel
11.7
126
184
Snails
1.40
50
90
Wild Game Nutrition Table

Blackpowder Shooting Tip

Those of you that have deer hunted for a few years know the scenario that I am about to describe…You have been sitting for hours, its cold, windy, your tired and you look to your left and there is the deer of your dreams.  Only problem is that your NOT ready to take the shot.  By the time you put him in your sights he is on his way out of the county.

Tip – I can not tell you how many deer I have been fortunate enough to harvest becaue I was ready when the opportunity presented itself.  Keep your rifle ready.  Hava shooting stick handy and be ready to use it the moment a deer safely provides that shot.  When in your stand, take the time to shoulder your rifle and make sure you can shoot from various angles.  When that shot presents itself, you will be ready!

Get em…out there!

Jeff

I’m Going Deer Hunting

…hello – hello **tap-tap**…is this thing on?…can you read me?…it appears this Blog has gone public…but I am spending some time in the wooded areas of Nebraska looking for venison backstraps and talking to my muzzleloading rifle…I’ll keep you updated on my observations from the field but I am looking forward to this season as the corn that frustrated November rifle hunters has come, or is coming, out of the field…I have kept track of a few such areas that contained alot of the standing stuff as I know it will provide some good hunting for me in December…type soon…

hershy

Smoke Poles and Deer

Perhaps few seasons make us feel as close to the natural world as our Muzzleloader Deer Season.  The fact that we have an entire month to pursue deer with the smoke pole is a tribute to the excellence in wildlife management our Agency has provided.

Currently the weather is cold and looks to get colder throughout next week.  This is an excellent time to take advantage of two strong elements in deer:

1. Any lingering signs of rutting activity – Bucks have spent the last several weeks learning what life is about.  The most mature deer will aggressively seek any lingering estrous does for one last hurrah before winter.  This being said, any does that were not mated in November as well as young does coming into estrous for the first time, will cause a second, more subdued rut to begin in December…roughly one month after the peak of the November rut which puts us into Dec 8 – 19 as key dates.  Don’t be afraid to rattle in December and estrous lures can work well too.

2. The need to feed – once the primary rut is over, deer that have invested all energy and time into breeding are now realizing they have few coals left to stoke the furnace and are eating considerably.  Hunters can take advantage of this by setting up in known feeding areas such as standing corn, harvested fields wtih waste grain, and hunting cover near those areas.  Deer are most likely to bed down closer to these hot food sources and that can really help the hunter.  Focus on these areas and keep in mind that when the temps drop midday, deer are very likely to move earely in the afternoon.   I have seen mature whitetails feeding in corn fields where I hunt at 230pm!

This is an excellent time to harvest a few extra does as well.  They will likely be moving early in the evening and soon we will be talking  about my favorite custom jerky recipes!  Did I mention I like jerky!!!!