Nebraska Outdoors Radio Show

The Show:   Nebraska Outdoors Radio
The Station: 1240 AM KFOR (Lincoln)
Listen Online: www.KFOR1240.com
The Day: Every Thursday
The Time: 6 to 7 p.m.
The #: 402-489-1240

It’s October!

Jeff & Aaron return from their sandhills “Becoming An Outdoors Woman” adventures with lots to talk about!  The glorious month of October is here and there is a whole bunch of good reasons & activities to get the family outdoors and enjoy the season of the harvest.  We take a look at the NGPC Outdoor Calendar & your Huntin’, Fishin’ & Campin’ Forecast.  As always we encourage you to join the conversation by calling 402-489-1240.

Girls hunt too!! Number 4 & 5! – FIELD REPORT/ARCHERY DEER: From Jessica

God is good!!!

Mentor Jeff, Me & Oct 2 Does

Saturday morning (Oct. 2) was another beautiful crisp morning. Jeff Micek (my mentor) had already harvested a doe about 15 minutes after light, which meant it was my turn now. Around 7:40am, I just so happened to glance over my right shoulder and saw a doe and her fawn standing there at 8 yards. Moving slower then ever, I reached up and grabbed my bow, and waited for her to turn away so I could draw my bow back. She kept walking and made it out to about 11 yards when I grunted at her to make her stop. As soon as I shot, she took off  like a bullet, but only made it about 70 yards before crashing. After field dressing my deer, it turned out to be a ‘CENTER’ punched heart shot! I suprised myself with that one! 

A Picture Any Deer Hunter Would Love

Courtnie & Me - Headed to HC

After a great hunt in the morning, it was all followed by a great night at my high school senior homecoming dance! That’s right…I dress up too!!

The following night (Sunday) I made it out hunting again with my mentor Neil, and made another great shot and harvested my 5th doe.  She passed Neil at about 27 yards and came close enough to lick the steps of my tree before walking out away from me at about 8 yards. She slowly turned broadside then stopped, looking the other way.  As soon as I shot, she jumped but then almost stopped like nothing happened. Then she took off running and made it about thirty yards before tipping over.  Less then 3 mins after she fell over, Neil had nice doe walk by him and he made a great double lung shot! Way to go Neil.

Mentor Neil, Me & Oct 3 Does

Jessica

October 1st – FIELD REPORT/ARCHERY DEER: From Sam

Tonight is October 1st and it wasn’t bad for deer hunting. We got in the stand at about 5:00 p.m. The first deer that I saw was a doe and a fawn about 95 yards to the south of me just across the creek. Right at 6:05, Kevin calls on the radio and says that there is a big buck on the other side of the creek moving east, away from me. I look up and the buck wasn’t there but there was a doe just on my side of the creek about 75 yards away and slowly moving west but after 15 minutes of grazing by the creek, she angled my way and I was ready with the camera on her and my bow ready. She moved very slowly until she was 20 yards away and then she started to run right to the base of my tree. At the moment that I was about to shoot, I noticed little bumps on HIS head, I had mistaken the large button-buck for a doe – I let him go.

At 6:20, just after I let the button-buck go, I look across the creek where the first doe was and saw a white tail flicker. I pulled my 10×42 binoculars up to look and I am staring at a monster 5×5 that would score around 130 inches. I was hoping that he would decide that the grass is greener on THIS side of the creek and come close enough for a good shot on video… He decided to do just the opposite and went back in to the woods not to be seen again for the night. I wasn’t too disappointed because there was still quite a bit of daylight left.

The other side of the creek must have been the hot spot because at 6:50 I look over there again and see 3 does and 2 little 4x4s. They walked east and out of sight, too. Daylight was fading. We were starting to wrap the night up and another fawn shows up out of no-where at 30 yards and starts to come my way, but daylight was fading fast now (he was too small for me to shoot anyway).

That night didn’t end too bad, we saw a shooter buck and several does, I had one only 5 yards and had a shot opportunity, but chose not to take it. Hopefully tomorrow night will be better.

Sam

First deer of 2010 – FIELD REPORT/ARCHERY DEER: From Sam

For the last 2 years, it has been my tradition of shooting a doe on the second hunt of the year. This year was no different. On Saturday September 25, we were in the stands by 6:15 a.m. and shooting time was 6:45. It was a cool and rainy morning, but yet the deer were some-what active.

 At 7:00, I saw a doe 7 yards away about to walk right in front of me. She walked to 11 yards, broadside; all I needed her to do was to turn away. Unfortunately, she didn’t and she cautiously walked back where she came from. Only 5 minutes later, I saw her again, but this time I saw her  when she was still in the cover where she couldn’t see me. So as slowly as possible I stood up and got ready for a shot. Once again she stopped exactly in the same spot she was before. She had her eyes on me once again. Then, she made her last mistake, she turned away just long enough for me to raise and draw my bow. She saw the movement but still didn’t move. I released my arrow and my bow’s limb bounced off a tree branch. Luckily I heard the CRACK of her shoulder and saw that my arrow had buried all the way down to the fletchings of my arrow.

I began to worry as the rain started to come down hard – off and on. Later my mentor, Kevin, called me on my radio and said that there was a doe and 2 fawns headed my way. I saw them to the north-west of me and running my way along the creek. I pulled my bow back again and grunted at her to stop. She stopped and I guessed the yardage at 30 (we only take shots 20 yards or less). So I let my bow down as she and her fawns trotted away. I got my rangefinder out and found out that she was only 20 yards – but I did the right thing by not taking the shot.

We got out of the stand early at about 9:45 to look for my doe. It was so rainy that day that there was no blood trail and that made me a little nervous. Kevin was the last one to see her just as she jumped across the field road. When we got down and went to the spot where we saw her last, we looked across and saw her white belly only 20 yards away – only 12 yards away from the property line!

When we got to her I noticed that my arrow had punched through both of the shoulders and she had only gone 90 yards (deer can run that far in a matter of seconds).  I picked her head up and she was a big doe. Since the weather wasn’t the best, a lot of hunters would have just stayed home, but we go whenever we can as long as it’s still safe.

I got to go out that afternoon as well, but our luck wasn’t quite as great. It was an amazing afternoon weather-wise, but the deer just didn’t seem to be moving quite as well as I thought they would. I only saw 2 fawns and 2 does and none of which were within 35 yards of me. No one got anything, but one member of our team got really close to a buck, but the shot just didn’t present itself.  I had a lot of fun on this hunt, and it’s only the start to a really long season, so hopefully, a lot more deer will be taken by our mentor program. 

Mentor Kevin & Me

Sam

3rd Doe Success! – FIELD REPORT/ARCHERY DEER: From Jessica

Another beautiful weekend in the woods and it all came to an end with Success! Sunday evening started out ‘VERY’ slow with no deer in sight. Around 6:40pm, I finally spotted a doe and fawn to the east of me, heading my way. After grazing and taking her time, she finally made it in to about 12 yards, slightly quartering away, with no clue I was there. I pulled back, squeezed the trigger, and let-r-rip!! The doe made it no more than 50 yards before crashing 20 yards from Deb, who was my hunting mentor/partner! It was a great double lung shot, with a slice in the heart. After getting down, field dressing my deer, and hauling it back to the truck, we met up with the guys to hear about their hunt! Kent (Deb’s husband) also had a great evening with the harvest of a big mature doe.

It looks like it’s going to be another beautiful weekend so I hope you all can get out and make memories of your own! Good Luck!!

Jessica

Whatchagot-Grouse

Those Beautiful Hills

…the prairie grouse (sharp-tailed grouse & prairie chickens) that inhabit the short-grass areas of the sandhills have several defenses against the human hunter…one is their good eyesight that allows them to see danger coming from afar – another is their mottled browns & off-white feathers that allow them to become dang-near invisible to the shotgun carrying predator as they make their living in the clump grasses…as if these two adaptations weren’t enough these sandhill birds have a very sinister desire to “off” us hunters by living in vast expanses of very un-flat terrain that is covered in sandburs & prickly pear…you may think my statement is a little extreme but that would just prove that you have never chased these feathered-boogers across miles of short-grassed, sand dunes only to see a family flock of sharpies jump 20 yards beyond your gun’s reach and appear to land ‘just over the hill‘ – which spurs you to walk several more hills of sand so that your trusty pointer can lock up hard on 1 ornate box turtle and exactly zero grouse…

…to celebrate opening weekend of the Prairie Grouse season I headed towards Valentine chasing the promise of grouse and good weather with my former College Adviser and two other grouse-nuts…we set-up base camp at Big Alkali Wildlife Area and had lots of fun telling stories and reliving past hunts…we ate some wonderful food and did our best to stay warm on the chilly, wet mornings of our hunt…though, the grouse were scarce and the shots few we had an amazing time – and surprisingly saw very few other hunters, even on the public access areas…we did manage to put enough sharpies in the game-pouch for a decent meal and plenty of memories to help start the season and perhaps provide some fodder for campfires yet to come…

Success

…Dr. Jim Pease, my former college prof, was in charge of cooking the grouse and I wanted to watch his technique so that I could add another recipe to my file – prairie grouse are sometimes given a bad name as table-fare, but I think this is mainly due to the fact that even ice cream wouldn’t be as popular if you had to walk several miles over rough terrain to secure it…so I watched Jim work his magic on the skinned-out birds as he readied them for the pot…he started  by placing garden-fresh tomatoes and peppers around the grouse as they lay in the cast-iron dutch oven…he then sprinkled onion flakes, garlic salt and several other spices on them…just as the dutch oven was being placed over the fire I asked Jim what he called his grouse recipe – his reply was “Whatchagot Grousecause you take whatcha-got in camp and put it in the pot with the grouse”…worked for me! – it was delicious…

Whatchagot Grouse

hershy

First Hunt – FIELD REPORT/ARCHERY DEER: From Sam

First Hunt of the 2010 Season

Maybe Next Time!

Sunday, September 19, was my first hunt of the 2010 fall archery deer season, and man was I pumped!  We got in the stands around 4:00 p.m., but it was really slow until about 6:00.  I was scanning the area from my tree stand and about 70 yards to the east of me, I saw a deer. I reached behind my tree to grab my binoculars to confirm that it was a doe…she was a HUGE doe.  As she grazed the grass not knowing I was there, I got ready, but she decided to coast east and out of sight.  Then just a second later I looked back east where she was standing and there was a fawn.  When the fawn came out into the clearing, I saw that there was another big doe right behind her.  I began to tremble with excitement as they started my way, but all of a sudden they started leaning north and went away. Once again in the exact same spot there was yet another doe.  I reached around my tree to grab my binoculars, and that’s when I heard the crack of a stick to the north of me.  I looked up and saw a beast of a buck running the opposite direction – right in front of my stand at 30 yards.  Dang it!  He must have seen my movement when I reached around the tree.  That was the last that I saw of him.  Hopefully I will see him again soon…with my arrow in him.

Sam